Egyptian Eye Of Ra

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Egyptian Eye Of Ra

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Egyptian Eye Of Ra

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The ancient Egyptian eye is a very important protection symbol that has many myths and legends. It is associated with two powerful sun-gods, the god Ra and the god Horus, whom each have myths that revolve around their eyes.

But the Egyptian eye is not limited to these two gods. In fact, many deities are associated with it. The eyes are linked to either the sun or moon, with the left eye usually being the lunar one and the right eye being the solar one.

Also, each eye is associated with certain deities. For example, the lunar eye is associated with the god Thoth and the god Horus. This independence of the eyes is wonderfully illustrated by a few myths, especially those related to the god Ra….

In one version of the creation myth of Heliopolis, the god Ra had only one eye at first. But then Nun, the deity that represents the primordial waters from which the god Ra arose, bestowed Ra a second eye.

This made the first eye angry and put Ra in a difficult position. He had to cajole them in order to keep them both happy, dividing their duties.

The lunar eye became associated with Tefnut, daughter of Ra. To read more about this myth, check out my page on the goddess Tefnut.

The eye of Ra has been associated with many goddesses, and in each case will take on a specific quality.

For example in its protective role, which is prone to turn into aggression and destruction, the eye is associated with the goddesses Hathor, Sekhmet, Tefnut and Wadjet.

A very interesting myth showcasing this protective-aggressive tendency is told on my page The Eye of Ra and the Destruction of Mankind. You might be wondering why the Egyptian eye is always part of a god, like Ra, but then when acting independently it is associated with a goddess.

Some have hypothesized, and I agree with their theories, that the protective-aggressive qualities that keep coming up in these myths are the way the ancient Egyptians viewed the divine feminine, and this perhaps comes from the way they observed female animals becoming very aggressive when they were protecting their young.

Lionesses and cats in particular, hence the way the Egyptian eye takes on feline forms in these myths.

The Egyptian eye has other qualities and roles. As the solar eye, it is a source of heat, light and fire. The lunar eye is associated with the god Horus, but how it became his is another interesting myth.

As a skilled magic practitioner and powerful goddess in her own right, she devised a plan to have him transfer some of his powers to her by telling her his secret name.

The secret name was the most potent and powerful name that a deity or mortal could have, and in order to keep these powers, the name had to remain secret.

In fact, the secret name was so important that it made up part of the anatomy of the ancient Egyptian soul. Take a look at my video below to find out more:.

So Isis waited for the opportunity to trick Ra into giving her his secret name. After aeons of traveling the skies every day, he had grown old and tired, and one day a little bit of his spit dribbled down the corner of his mouth and fell onto the earth.

Isis took this spit and mixed it with some earth and molded it into the shape of a cobra, which came to life.

Though a god was usually immune to mortal dangers, since this snake was made from his own spit, its poison could penetrate his being and harm him.

She hid the cobra on his daily path. When Ra was bitten and the poison made its way through his body, he was in severe pain and cried out for help.

None of the other deities could help, but Isis offered to relieve him if he told her his secret name. After negotiating the terms, Ra agreed to give Horus, the son of Isis, his eyes.

Of course, this myth was not the exclusive explanation for how the Egyptian eye went from being the Eye of Ra to the Eye of Horus.

Seth captured the Eye of Horus during one of their many battles and threw it into the darkness where it broke into pieces.

Thoth had seen where the eye had landed and went to look for it. The gods feared the eye would kill all humans. Ra used red beer to make his eye drunk and it passed out.

Then, the eye became peaceful again and returned to Ra. Many people believe that the Egyptians symbolized the Eye of Ra with the same image as that used to symbolize the Eye of Horus.

Some scholars think that the sun-disc encircled by two uraeus cobras was the Egyptian symbol for the Eye of Ra.

The Egyptians saw several goddesses as personifications of this symbol, including Bastet, Hathor , Mut, Sekhmet, and Wadjet.

The Eye of Ra represented the sun to the Egyptians. Often, it was associated with the destructive power of the sun, but Egyptians also used it to protect buildings and themselves.

The Eye of Ra was a symbol of royal authority. The Eye of Ra played a part in the worship of the goddesses the Egyptians saw as its personifications.

The Egyptians saw each goddess as the mother, sibling, consort and daughter of Ra. They conducted rituals to celebrate the life-giving aspects of the Eye of Ra.

Some of these rituals took place at the New Year to celebrate the eye's return to Egypt and the arrival of the Nile floods. The Egyptians also celebrated dangerous aspects of the Eye of Ra.

Symbols of the eye were used to invoke the god's protection. People believed that the queen was the earthly personification of the various goddesses associated with the Eye of Ra.

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Egyptian Eye Of Ra The “Wadjet” Egyptian Eye Video

EGYPT EYE OF RA

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The eyes of Egyptian deities , although they are aspects of the power of the gods who own them, sometimes take active roles in mythology, possibly because the word for "eye" in Egyptian , jrt , resembles another word meaning "do" or "act".

The presence of the feminine suffix -t in jrt may explain why these independent eyes were thought of as female. The Eye of Ra, in particular, is deeply involved in the sun god's creative actions.

In Egyptian mythology , the sun's emergence from the horizon each morning is likened to Ra's birth, an event that revitalizes him and the order of the cosmos.

Ra emerges from the body of a goddess who represents the sky—usually Nut. Depictions of the rising sun often show Ra as a child contained within the solar disk.

In this context, the Egyptologist Lana Troy suggests, the disk may represent the womb from which he is born or the placenta that emerges with him.

The Eye of Ra can also take the form of a goddess, which according to Troy is both the mother who brings Ra forth from her womb and a sister who is born alongside him like a placenta.

Ra was sometimes said to enter the body of the sky goddess at sunset, impregnating her and setting the stage for his rebirth at sunrise. Consequently, the Eye, as womb and mother of the child form of Ra, is also the consort of the adult Ra.

The adult Ra, likewise, is the father of the Eye who is born at sunrise. The Eye is thus a feminine counterpart to Ra's masculine creative power, part of a broader Egyptian tendency to express creation and renewal through the metaphor of sexual reproduction.

Ra gives rise to his daughter, the Eye, who in turn gives rise to him, her son, in a cycle of constant regeneration. Ra is not unique in this relationship with the Eye.

Other solar gods may interact in a similar way with the numerous goddesses associated with the Eye. Hathor , a goddess of the sky, the sun, and fertility, is often called the Eye of Ra, and she also has a relationship with Horus, who also has solar connections, that is similar to the relationship between Ra and his Eye.

The myth takes place before the creation of the world , when the solar creator—either Ra or Atum—is alone. Shu and Tefnut , the children of this creator god, have drifted away from him in the waters of Nu , the chaos that exists before creation in Egyptian belief, so he sends out his Eye to find them.

The Eye returns with Shu and Tefnut but is infuriated to see that the creator has developed a new eye, which has taken her place.

The creator god appeases her by giving her an exalted position on his forehead in the form of the uraeus , the emblematic cobra that appears frequently in Egyptian art, particularly on royal crowns.

The equation of the Eye with the uraeus and the crown underlines the Eye's role as a companion to Ra and to the pharaoh , with whom Ra is linked.

Upon the return of Shu and Tefnut, the creator god is said to have shed tears, although whether they are prompted by happiness at his children's return or distress at the Eye's anger is unclear.

These tears give rise to the first humans. In a variant of the story, it is the Eye that weeps instead, so the Eye is the progenitor of humankind.

The tears of the Eye of Ra are part of a more general connection between the Eye and moisture. In addition to representing the morning star, the Eye can also be equated with the star Sothis Sirius.

Every summer, at the start of the Egyptian year , Sothis's heliacal rising , in which the star rose above the horizon just before the sun itself, heralded the start of the Nile inundation , which watered and fertilized Egypt's farmland.

Therefore, the Eye of Ra precedes and represents the floodwaters that restore fertility to all of Egypt. The Eye of Ra also represents the destructive aspect of Ra's power: the heat of the sun , which in Egypt can be so harsh that the Egyptians sometimes likened it to arrows shot by a god to destroy evildoers.

The uraeus is a logical symbol for this dangerous power. In art, the sun disk image often incorporates one or two uraei coiled around it.

The solar uraeus represents the Eye as a dangerous force that encircles the sun god and guards against his enemies, spitting flames like venom.

Collectively called "Hathor of the Four Faces", they represent the Eye's vigilance in all directions. Ra's enemies are the forces of chaos, which threaten maat , the cosmic order that he creates.

They include both humans who spread disorder and cosmic powers like Apep , the embodiment of chaos, whom Ra and the gods who accompany him in his barque are said to combat every night.

Some unclear passages in the Coffin Texts suggest that Apep was thought capable of injuring or stealing the Eye of Ra from its master during the combat.

The Eye's aggression may even extend to deities who, unlike Apep, are not regarded as evil. Evidence in early funerary texts suggests that at dawn, Ra was believed to swallow the multitude of other gods, who in this instance are equated with the stars, which vanish at sunrise and reappear at sunset.

In doing so, he absorbs the gods' power, thereby renewing his own vitality, before spitting them out again at nightfall. The solar Eye is said to assist in this effort, slaughtering the gods for Ra to eat.

The red light of dawn therefore signifies the blood produced by this slaughter. He sends the Eye—Hathor, in her aggressive manifestation as the lioness goddess Sekhmet —to massacre them.

She does so, but after the first day of her rampage, Ra decides to prevent her from killing all humanity. He orders that beer be dyed red and poured out over the land.

The Eye goddess drinks the beer, mistaking it for blood, and in her inebriated state returns to Ra without noticing her intended victims. Through her drunkenness she has been returned to a harmless form.

The red beer might then refer to the red silt that accompanied the subsequent Nile flood, which was believed to end the period of misfortune.

The solar Eye's volatile nature can make her difficult even for her master to control. In the myth of the "Distant Goddess", a motif with several variants, the Eye goddess becomes upset with Ra and runs away from him.

In some versions the provocation for her anger seems to be her replacement with a new eye after the search for Shu and Tefnut, but in others her rebellion seems to take place after the world is fully formed.

The Eye's absence and Ra's weakened state may be a mythological reference to solar eclipses. This motif also applies to the Eye of Horus, which in the Osiris myth is torn out and must be returned or healed so that Horus may regain his strength.

Meanwhile, the Eye wanders in a distant land— Nubia , Libya , or Punt. To restore order, one of the gods goes out to retrieve her.

In one version, known from scattered allusions, the warrior god Anhur searches for the Eye, which takes the form of the goddess Mehit , using his skills as a hunter.

In other accounts, it is Shu who searches for Tefnut, who in this case represents the Eye rather than an independent deity.

His efforts are not uniformly successful; at one point, the goddess is so enraged by Thoth's words that she transforms from a relatively benign cat into a fire-breathing lioness, making Thoth jump.

When the goddess is at last placated, the retrieving god escorts her back to Egypt. Her return marks the beginning of the inundation and the new year.

Mehit becomes the consort of Anhur, Tefnut is paired with Shu, and Thoth's spouse is sometimes Nehemtawy , a minor goddess associated with this pacified form of the Eye.

The goddess' transformation from hostile to peaceful is a key step in the renewal of the sun god and the kingship that he represents. The dual nature of the Eye goddess shows, as Graves-Brown puts it, that "the Egyptians saw a double nature to the feminine, which encompassed both extreme passions of fury and love.

The characteristics of the Eye of Ra were an important part of the Egyptian conception of female divinity in general, [38] and the Eye was equated with many goddesses, ranging from very prominent deities like Hathor to obscure ones like Mestjet, a lion goddess who appears in only one known inscription.

The Egyptians associated many gods who took felid form with the sun, and many lioness deities, like Sekhmet, Menhit, and Tefnut, were equated with the Eye.

Bastet was depicted as both a domestic cat and a lioness, and with these two forms she could represent both the peaceful and violent aspects of the Eye.

Mut was first called the Eye of Ra in the late New Kingdom, and the aspects of her character that were related to the Eye grew increasingly prominent over time.

Likewise, cobra goddesses often represented the Eye. Among them was Wadjet , a tutelary deity of Lower Egypt who was closely associated with royal crowns and the protection of the king.

The deities associated with the Eye were not restricted to feline and serpent forms. Hathor's usual animal form is a cow, as is that of the closely linked Eye goddess Mehet-Weret.

Frequently, two Eye-related goddesses appear together, representing different aspects of the Eye. The juxtaposed deities often stand for the procreative and aggressive sides of the Eye's character, [24] as Hathor and Sekhmet sometimes do.

But the Egyptian eye is not limited to these two gods. In fact, many deities are associated with it. The eyes are linked to either the sun or moon, with the left eye usually being the lunar one and the right eye being the solar one.

Also, each eye is associated with certain deities. For example, the lunar eye is associated with the god Thoth and the god Horus.

This independence of the eyes is wonderfully illustrated by a few myths, especially those related to the god Ra….

In one version of the creation myth of Heliopolis, the god Ra had only one eye at first. But then Nun, the deity that represents the primordial waters from which the god Ra arose, bestowed Ra a second eye.

This made the first eye angry and put Ra in a difficult position. He had to cajole them in order to keep them both happy, dividing their duties.

The lunar eye became associated with Tefnut, daughter of Ra. To read more about this myth, check out my page on the goddess Tefnut.

The eye of Ra has been associated with many goddesses, and in each case will take on a specific quality. For example in its protective role, which is prone to turn into aggression and destruction, the eye is associated with the goddesses Hathor, Sekhmet, Tefnut and Wadjet.

A very interesting myth showcasing this protective-aggressive tendency is told on my page The Eye of Ra and the Destruction of Mankind.

You might be wondering why the Egyptian eye is always part of a god, like Ra, but then when acting independently it is associated with a goddess.

Some have hypothesized, and I agree with their theories, that the protective-aggressive qualities that keep coming up in these myths are the way the ancient Egyptians viewed the divine feminine, and this perhaps comes from the way they observed female animals becoming very aggressive when they were protecting their young.

Lionesses and cats in particular, hence the way the Egyptian eye takes on feline forms in these myths.

The Egyptian eye has other qualities and roles. As the solar eye, it is a source of heat, light and fire. The lunar eye is associated with the god Horus, but how it became his is another interesting myth.

As a skilled magic practitioner and powerful goddess in her own right, she devised a plan to have him transfer some of his powers to her by telling her his secret name.

The secret name was the most potent and powerful name that a deity or mortal could have, and in order to keep these powers, the name had to remain secret.

In fact, the secret name was so important that it made up part of the anatomy of the ancient Egyptian soul. Take a look at my video below to find out more:.

So Isis waited for the opportunity to trick Ra into giving her his secret name. After aeons of traveling the skies every day, he had grown old and tired, and one day a little bit of his spit dribbled down the corner of his mouth and fell onto the earth.

Isis took this spit and mixed it with some earth and molded it into the shape of a cobra, which came to life.

Though a god was usually immune to mortal dangers, since this snake was made from his own spit, its poison could penetrate his being and harm him.

She hid the cobra on his daily path. When Ra was bitten and the poison made its way through his body, he was in severe pain and cried out for help.

None of the other deities could help, but Isis offered to relieve him if he told her his secret name. After negotiating the terms, Ra agreed to give Horus, the son of Isis, his eyes.

Of course, this myth was not the exclusive explanation for how the Egyptian eye went from being the Eye of Ra to the Eye of Horus.

Seth captured the Eye of Horus during one of their many battles and threw it into the darkness where it broke into pieces.

Thoth had seen where the eye had landed and went to look for it. He found the eye broken, but managed to restore it back to its original form.

As he did, he also restored the moon back to its full light, as this eye was lunar.

If you did, please Free Online Casino Slots With Bonus Rounds No Download it with anyone else you think might like it. Google Analytics Cookies. The eyes are linked to either the sun or moon, with the left eye usually being the lunar one and the right eye being the solar one. Isis took this spit and mixed it with some earth and molded it into the shape of Casino Du Liban cobra, which came to life. All Slots Casino Android App Life of the Egyptian Gods. Often, the texts of such rituals specifically mention a set of four defensive uraei. The disk could even be regarded as Ra's physical form. Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis. The sun disks and uraei that were incorporated into queens' headdresses during the New Kingdom reflect this mythological tie.

Egyptian Eye Of Ra - Bewertungen und Rezensionen

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Egyptian Eye Of Ra Eye of Ra Meaning Video

Miscellaneous Myths: Sekhmet/The Eye of Ra In another myth, Ra became angry Casino Slot Machines Free Games how humans were treating him. In Fisher, Marjorie M. Seth captured the Eye of Horus Free Pokies one of their many battles and threw it into the darkness where it broke into pieces. Borghouts, J. Ancient Egyptian religion.

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